Learning through Audio-supported Reading: Myth or Reality?

The following free webinar is being offered by the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (NC-AEM)…

Learning through Audio-supported Reading: Myth or Reality?

Wednesday, June 14, 2017
2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EDT

The validity of reading along with audio is often questioned by educators and families. What do we know about appropriate and effective uses of audio-supported reading (ASR)?  This webinar will demonstrate the advantages of mixing the modalities of sight and sound to support reading. See how ASR enhances reading comprehension by accelerating information processing, reducing cognitive load, and facilitating working memory. A variety of tools that enable ASR across platforms and device types will be described.

Use this link for more information and to register for this webinar…

Presenter – Richard Jackson

Richard Jackson, Ed.D.Richard Jackson assists in the development of CAST’s universally designed technology to meet the needs of individuals with visual disabilities.

An Associate Professor and a Director of Projects in Low-Incidence Disabilities at Boston College since 1989, Dr. Jackson is himself visually impaired. He has held major federal grants of national significance in training teachers of the blind and multiply disabled.

From 1999-2004, Dr. Jackson served as Director of Practice for the National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum (NCAC) at CAST and acted as CAST’s liaison to Boston College, an NCAC partner. Currently, he is assisting with the work of the NIMAS/AIM Consortium project. He is also working on CAST’s initiative to develop digitally supported approaches to composition. Additionally, he contributes his expertise in standards-based reform to CAST’s federal project for the creation and evaluation of a technology-based system that blends Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) and Universal Design for Learning in digital learning environments to improve reading comprehension instruction for students with disabilities.

Dr. Jackson brings to his work at CAST almost thirty years of experience as a teacher, a project director, a researcher, and an advocate in the field of education and visual disabilities. He has conducted research for Apple Computer and for the National Eye Institute, and is the founder of the Association of Massachusetts Educators of Students with Vision Impairments.

Tackled Digital Accessibility

From the Center on Technology and Disability

fingers on computer keyboardAs states and districts across the nation increase their use of technology to support instruction and communication, the issue of accessible content for students, families, and community members with disabilities needs to be front and center in the decision making process. Addressing digital accessibility takes a team-based approach.

Join the Center on Technology and Disability on Tuesday, May 23 from 2:30-4:00 PM/ET for an engaging panel discussion to learn how the state of Utah is collaborating across departments to develop strategies to increase digital accessibility at the state and district levels. Panelists from Utah will discuss accessibility challenges, the overarching infrastructure they developed on a state level, and break down the process they’ve established to ensure that materials are accessible to all audiences. Participants will have the opportunity to submit questions prior to the webinar to engage in an active Q&A with the panelists.

Register for this opportunity to engage with the expert panel…

Interested in learning more? Contact the CTD Technical Assistance Lead for SEA/LEA support, Kristin Ruedel at KRuedel@air.org.

Webinar: What You Need to Know To Make Sure Your Website Is Accessible To All

Date: April 11, 2017
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM ET

Program Description

Information Technology“Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can use the Web.” So says the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) – Web Accessibility Initiative, the group that publishes the “standards” known as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

In this ninety-minute webinar, we will discuss the legal and practical aspects of Accessible Web Design, how to assess your own website, and where to turn to when things are not meeting the requirements.

Learning objectives:

  • What are the laws/rules that pertain to web accessibility.
  • How can I tell if my website is accessible to people with disabilities.
  • Where do I go for assistance to make my website accessible.
  • What resources are available.

This webinar is designed for anyone interested in web accessibility including site administrators and content creators. Knowledge of programming code is not required.

Presenter

John E. Brandt, Training Coordinator, Maine CITE
With more than 30 years of experience in the fields of education, psychology and technology, John has been working in the web design business since 1994. He started serving as a consultant to Maine CITE in 1999 and developed their first website using the elements of accessible and universal web design. Over the years, John has offered numerous training programs on accessibility, served on numerous committees and consulted with many organizations with a goal of making technology accessible to everyone.

Registration

>>Please use this link to register for this webinar<< 

Please read and follow the directions linked here to access the webinar. We suggest that you test your system and check the technical requirements as soon as possible.

Certificates of Attendance

At the end of presentation, you will be given a link to a website where you can fill out an optional program evaluation form. Certificates of Attendance will be sent (via e-mail) to those who have completed the evaluation form.

Accommodations

CART captioning is provided for all Maine CITE webinar. If you need an additional accommodation to participate in this webinar, please contact Maine CITE Program via e-mail at iweb@mainecite.org or by calling 207-621-3195