Foster a More Inclusive Learning Environment

From CoSN (Consortium for School Networking)…

All About Accessibility: Using Microsoft Solutions to Foster a More Inclusive Learning Environment

A Microsoft Solution Session Webinar

Thursday, January 13, 2022 
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. ET

Microsoft logoAccessibility isn’t nice to have; it’s necessary. With more than one billion people in the world living with a disability, accessibility is essential to the progress of all people. Simply putting more devices in students’ hands is not enough; they deserve access to an equitable education – including best-in-class learning solutions and technologies. These solutions must be inclusively designed, giving students multiple ways to create, engage, and participate in constructing knowledge regardless of ability, income, language, location, or identity.

In this CoSN Solution Spotlight Webinar, Technology Leaders will learn how Microsoft’s inclusively designed education solutions support school systems in providing accessibility options that are built-in, mainstream, non-stigmatizing, and free.

Please use this link for more details and to register

Creating Accessible Digital Documents webinar

Date: November 23, 2021
Time: 2:00 – 3:30pm ET
Cost: Free

computer keyboardThe Great Lakes ADA Center in collaboration with the Great Plains and Southeast ADA Center invite you to join the upcoming Accessible Technology Webinar Series session titled “Creating Accessible Digital Documents” on Tuesday, November 23, 2021 from 2:00 – 3:30pm ET.

Digital documents can often create barriers for people with disabilities. Many of these barriers are easy to remove with training around how people with disabilities use technology. In this course, participants will learn how people with disabilities use technology to access documents, characteristics of accessible documents, and practical tips for ensuring accessibility.

The presenter for this program is Emily Shuman, Director, Rocky Mountain ADA Center.

Registration

Registration is required. The session will have human generated real-time captioning provided.

Use thins link to register for this event www.ada-accessibletech.org

Registration deadline:   Monday, November 22, 2021

Questions should be directed to webinars@adaconferences.org or by calling 877-232-1990 (V/TTY)

 

DCMP Helps Bring Audio Described Content to YouTube

Pictogram of Audio Description logoFrom the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP)

DCMP is involved with a new YouTube pilot program designed to give participating content creators the ability to add audio description to their videos through a secondary audio track. We’ve been partnering with science communicator Emily Graslie to help bring Art Lab to YouTube as the very first educational series with native audio description! DCMP was a pioneer in bringing audio description to streaming media, and we’re thrilled to be working with Emily and YouTube in expanding accessibility to people with disabilities on a global scale.

You may know Emily Graslie as the host of The Field Museum’s Brain Scoop series, which is available with audio description at DCMP, or from her recent broadcast television debut on PBS in Prehistoric Road Trip. Her new series, Art Lab, celebrates art and science, how they come together, and how the skills used by artists help teach scientific concepts to a general audience. Art Lab will also be available to families and educators at dcmp.org.

Not only does Art Lab have audio description, but DCMP serves as technical advisor and accessibility provider to help make the series accessible from concept to completion.

We hope you take the time to be involved in this project yourself by viewing Art Lab with the audio description turned on! To activate the description, look for the Settings icon (a gear shape) at the bottom of the YouTube player, click “Audio Track,” and then choose “English Descriptive” to turn on audio description. Keep in mind that only a small number of content creators currently have access to this feature—but you can always find thousands of videos with audio description at DCMP!

ArtLab on YouTube

 

Medical Doctor Certification No Longer Required for Reading Disabilities

From the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (NC-AEM)

NLS Publishes New Regulations: Medical Doctor Certification No Longer Required for Reading Disabilities

student with stack of booksWe’re pleased to inform you of important regulatory changes that should ease access to accessible formats of materials for students with reading disabilities, including dyslexia.

Background

In March of 2020, we sent a notification about changes to U.S. copyright law that have an impact on students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and may also qualify to receive accessible formats of materials derived from the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS). At that time, the Library of Congress Technical Corrections Act of 2019 had amended terminology for persons eligible to receive accessible materials consistent with the Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act (MTIA).

Please see the following section of our website for details about that March 2020 notification: NIMAS Terms Clarified Post Marrakesh. You may also recall that in January of 2020 the U.S. Department of Education included information and language about the impact of changes made by the MTIA within procedures for receiving a FFY 2020 Part B grant award. 

Update

On February 12, 2021, the National Library Service (NLS) published the regulations that go along with the Library of Congress Technical Corrections Act of 2019. In addition to expanding the list of persons who may certify a student’s eligibility for accessible formats, the Library of Congress removed the requirement for certification by a medical doctor for those with reading disabilities. Educators, school psychologists, and certified reading specialists are now among the professionals authorized to certify students with reading disabilities.

Read the Library of Congress’s final rule: Loans of Library Materials for Blind and Other Print-Disabled Persons: A Rule by the Library of Congress on 02/12/2021.

The National AEM Center will be providing technical assistance to states and districts to support the implementation of these changes. Our team welcomes any immediate questions or concerns. Please contact us at aem@cast.org.

In these otherwise challenging times, we’re relieved to celebrate this advancement in access with you, your students, and their families.

Sincerely,

Cynthia Curry
Director of Technical Assistance, CAST
Director of the National AEM Center

 

National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled (NLS) issues new guidelines

NIMAC logoNational Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled (NLS) has issued new eligibility guidelines for their services. The guidelines have been revised to align them with changes to copyright made by the Marrakesh Treaty Implementation Act (MTIA).

While the new guidelines are important for NSL users, they also have an impact on National Instructional Materials Access Standard – NIMAS eligibility criteria. The revised Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 – IDEA 2004 requires that students have an IEP and a qualifying disability in order to be eligible for materials produced from NIMAS. For the qualifying disability criterion, the legislation points to the NLS guidelines. For this reason, it is recommended that all National Instructional Materials Access Center – NIMAC users review the new guidelines.

A significant and positive change for NIMAS noted is that the pool of professionals that qualify to certify eligibility has been expanded to read:

(2) Eligibility must be certified by one of the following: doctor of medicine, doctor of osteopathy, ophthalmologist, optometrist, psychologist, registered nurse, therapist, and professional staff of hospitals, institutions, and public or welfare agencies (such as an educator, a social worker, case worker, counselor, rehabilitation teacher, certified reading specialist, school psychologist, superintendent, or librarian).

The NIMAC will soon be updating its Limitation of Use Agreements and Coordination Agreements to incorporate the updated language, and providing additional guidance related to the change.

 

7th Annual CAST UDL Symposium!

The following comes from CAST

Located near Boston, CAST is a nonprofit education research and development organization that created the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework and Guidelines, now used the world over to make learning more inclusive.

Register now for the 7th Annual CAST UDL Symposium!

Education2020 was a year for the history books, challenging us to make dramatic, unexpected changes quickly. We also confirmed that radical change in teaching and learning is possible. But 2020 also illuminated barriers to learning like never before. How do we ensure that the future is intentionally planned in a way that achieves the outcomes we hope for?

The 7th Annual CAST UDL Symposium will highlight promising work taking place in the field and will also serve as a forum to think about how we can begin to intentionally design for a better future right now. This year’s event is not about UDL as it has always been done. It is about the dramatic changes that we hope to see in the future and the innovations that can lead us there. Join us for a learning and networking experience filled with connected conversations that elevate our thinking around UDL and the future designed.

Use this link to register for the 7th Annual CAST UDL Symposium now.

Learn more about the CAST UDL Symposium by visiting our website.

Apple’s Vision for Learning with iPad

Voice Over Utility logo from AppleApple has published a new resource for educators about using iPad for learning. Separated into four sections: Connect, Collaborative, Creative, and Personal, the resource PDF provides information on topics such as accessibility, productivity, creative projects for learners and apps for education. In addition, the resource provides links to free curricular and learning resources and professional learning opportunities.

Use this link to view/download Apple’s Vision for Learning with iPad

 

Imageshare 3.0 released

groups of students and teacher in classroom viewing digital contentFrom the DIAGRAM Center

The DIAGRAM Center is thrilled to announce the public release of Imageshare 3.0!

With over 2500 resources made up of over 3500 individual files covering common topics in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), gone are the days of spending hours hand crafting tactiles for your students.  Imageshare 3.0 is the beginning of a true one-stop-shop for all you multi-modal needs.

We will be hosting a webinar unveiling Imageshare 3.0 in the coming weeks so make sure to keep an eye out for the registration announcement. And if you are new to the Imageshare project you may wish to check out the getting started video to get an overview of how it works (warning – video is on auto-start).

If you have questions, feedback or wish to provide resources to the collection please feel free to email Amaya directly or reach out to the team at info@diagramcenter.org.

Visit and start using Imageshare 3.0…

 

Benefits of Audio Description in Education (BADIE) contest

Pictogram of Audio Description logoThe American Council of the Blind’s Audio Description Project (ACB-ADP) and the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP) are cosponsoring an exciting opportunity for young people who are blind and visually impaired: The Benefits of Audio Description in Education (BADIE) contest. Students aged 7 to 21 can participate in one of four categories.

Multimedia experiences are integral to public, private, and special education curriculum. Audio description provides access to all the visual images of the films and videos that young people who are sighted enjoy.

Students can choose a described video from the thousands of titles available through DCMP, libraries, or video streaming services.

Reviews can be submitted in writing, in braille, or via an audio recording. Entries can also be submitted via email or postal mail.

Deadline for entries is Friday, January 22, 2021. Contest winners in each category will be chosen by February 19, 2021, and the grand-prize winner will receive an iPad Mini! Each first-place winner will receive a $100 iTunes gift card. Second-place winners will receive a $50 iTunes gift card, and the third-place winners will receive a $25 iTunes gift card. Each supporting teacher who has a first-place winning student will be awarded a $100 Amazon gift card.

Learn More about the Benefits of Audio Description in Education (BADIE) contest

Reliable Source of Ebooks for Special Education Students

Back to School 2020: Special Education Students Can Learn Anywhere with Bookshare

Bookshare logoThe following comes from Bookshare…

Some schools are offering blended learning where students spend a few days in down-sized classrooms and the other days doing online classes from home. Still other schools are starting with 100% distance learning and then phasing in on-site classes to small cohorts of students in “learning pods.”

No matter what the school environment looks like, the stakes are even higher for students with learning differences. How can teachers provide books in alternate formats so students with reading barriers like dyslexia, blindness, and cerebral palsy can complete assignments, no matter where and how learning is taking place?

Bookshare Makes the New Reality of Education Less Uncertain…read more about Bookshare

To help teachers prepare for a successful back to school, the Bookshare staff has assembled a collection of valuable resources, tips, step-by-step guides, video tutorials, curated reading lists, and webinars. Visit the back-to-school resource page for details…